Psychosocial Causes, and ‘The Real’

The tendency has always been strong to believe that whatever has a name must be an entity or being, having an independent existence of its own. And if no entity answering to the name could be found, men did not for that reason suppose that none existed, but imagined that it was something peculiarly abstruse and mysterious. –JS Mill

I just read a psychosocial report on psychosis. While I agree with looking at psychosocial causes of psychosis, the report states that psychosis is not real the way a broken bone is real. That there are no medical tests, like an x-ray, that can help us diagnose psychosis.

I think, when thinking about the ‘mental’ or ‘psychological’, people get mystified by it. That’s one reason why I decided to refer to schizophrenia as a brain disorder. The fact is, in many people who experience psychosis, there *are* biological differences. There is, according to many studies, excessive pruning of neurons in the brain. There is, moreover, often chemical differences, which is why regulating dopamine in my brain is helpful to me.

However, that doesn’t mean psychosocial causes aren’t important. I’m a believer that they can be causes just like, if someone kicks you in the leg, you may get a broken leg. Not everyone who gets kicked in the leg will experience a broken leg, but some will. There are a lot of factors at play, such as how hard they kicked you, if you were kicked more than once, and how vulnerable your leg is to being broken. And when we look at data, we will find that people who got kicked in the leg will show up more to the hospital with a broken leg, just like we find that people who, eg, experience childhood trauma will more often later show up with psychosis.

So we think of a broken leg as a medical problem with the leg, and I (at least) think of psychosis as a disorder of the brain. This, even though abuse may be the cause of both of them.

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