Here Lies My Blog

Dear Reader,

I do not intend to write more at this blog. This has been an outlet for me, at times, to try on different hats, explore ideas and practice writing–a hobby of mine.

But it’s time to say farewell.

These days, there’s just too much I need to take care of in my life to keep up a quality blog–not that this blog was ever what one would deem “quality.”

See, this blog was initially related to the rest of the site–a professional blog. It morphed, as time went on, into a personal blog, where I shared ideas, thoughts, tried on different hats and, possibly, made a ton of errors. Hey–it’s my blog, my errors. I own them. But the blog, as it currently stands, doesn’t really relate to the rest of the site. It’s a mismatch. And I don’t have the time to keep it up and make it more professional. (Besides, I’m not in the same headspace I was when I made this website.)

I’m leaving the whole site, including this blog, up for a while–but don’t think it will be here forever.

Everyone knows that to be in contact with me, you should follow me on Facebook. That’s where I keep in contact with my friends and family.

I hope you have enjoyed reading.

RIP, blog. As they say, “It’s been real. And it’s been fun. But it ain’t been real fun.”

 

This Portfolio Is a Relic Of What I Once Was

This is my blog. The rest of this website is my e-portfolio. I made it several years ago. You can browse around and see my various, mostly professional, accomplishments.

At this point in my life, the portfolio part seems to be a relic of what I once was.

Around 2008, I had my first psychotic break. It just hasn’t been the same since then. I was on the path to become an academic–aiming for a PhD in Philosophy, with the goal of becoming a professor. I had to leave school, which I loved, and go through the years-long process of recovery. I don’t know that full recovery from my diagnosis of schizophrenia is possible for me.

I have a long-time counselor who suggests I simply modify my expectations in life; to live life as a disabled person. I resisted that for a long time, but now I think, after various trials and tribulations, that this is wise advice.

I plan to still maintain this blog and keep this website for a while. It goes to show that someone with promise–someone very career-oriented, who excelled in school and work–can become disabled and have their dreams dashed.

People with disabilities are often looked down upon. People don’t often take kindly towards them, especially if one has a disability like mine, which is heavily stigmatized. However, writing is one thing I can do (when I have the energy) and it’s something I love. So, I aim to continue doing that here if and when I can.

The past year has had its ups and downs. I started an online magazine which did pretty well but that I can’t keep up anymore. I tried to start an organization, but I simply cannot do the work necessary to follow through. It’s not my choice to be disabled. I simply am. All the evidence here will show I tried my darndest to be anything but disabled. My family can attest to my disability and the evidence–as well as my family and friends–can testify to my constant desire to try to keep plodding through.

This isn’t a pity party. This is how I feel right now.

For now, I leave you with this image I found on the internet. I post it partly tongue-in-cheek. But it’s how I will be remembered, having been a pretty good philosopher, an award-winning poet, and a “failure” nevertheless.

Poll: Guaranteed Jobs

There’s been talk recently about the idea of guaranteed jobs. The idea is that anyone who wants a job is, well, guaranteed one. This idea has been floated by many on both sides of the political spectrum. It’s even proposed by a philosopher who is running for Congress.

On one hand, I think, well, we should be working less, not demanding more jobs for everyone. On the other hand, I think, coupled with a shorter work week and a Basic income, guaranteed jobs may be a great thing.

So, what do you think? Should we have guaranteed jobs?

Coming Soon

She Works Hard For The Money

Lately, I’ve been thinking about money. And I’ve been thinking about working. As readers know, I tried working last month. It turned out really bad for me.

But as kids graduate high school and college this time of year and they start turning to the job market, I’ve began really thinking about whether it’s even just to require that people work–literally work–for the basic necessities of life. This is especially true in America, where we have the ability to provide things to people without them having to work.

I’ve thought a lot about things like Basic Income. And it’s not just the automation issue that motivates me. It’s the fact that in order to have any necessities of life–let alone luxuries–people must toil for “the man.”

Currently, the workplace and the culture of work permeates our society. People try–and sometimes fail–to climb the ladder of “success.” And “success” is often measured by one’s ability to perform certain tasks for a business.

When did we forget to enjoy our lives? When did we stop thinking that leisure time was “extra” and not a requirement?

I know many people who work 40 hours or more each week. 40 freakin’ hours. Or more. This is at a time when Keynes anticipated a 20 hour work week. Imagine: 20 hours of work and the rest for what you will. That sounds a lot more like it. (Granted, I still don’t know if I’d be capable of such activity.)

We need to remember Keynes’ vision–his projection. It was based on the fact that the American worker is so productive that all we really even need is a 20 hour work week. It’s well-known that pushing people over that threshold of productivity leads to waste, boredom, burnout, and more. The 40 hour work week is bunk and needs to go.

Let’s replace the current standard. Let’s advocate for a shorter work week. Let’s advocate for a Basic Income. Let’s take pride in leisure instead of work. In the end, your body, mind, spirit, family and friends will thank you. And you will have more time for hobbies and developing yourself focused on things other than marketability.

I Gave It My Best Shot

I just got off the phone with Social Security to report that I have stopped working. Some people in my life know that last month, April, I tried to work. And I really tried.

I ended up in bed for a week and a half. Utterly exhausted, I wasn’t showering or brushing my teeth and I was quickly going downhill mentally.

This was my best shot at working.

Psychiatrists have told me not to work. My counselor has told me not to work. But I got to feeling that perhaps I could work, so I tried. Well, I hate to say it, but the psychiatrist and counselor are correct. I cannot work.

I have done my best to tie up loose ends and get myself back to where I was before I started working–focused on self-care, fitness and keeping myself healthy.

Some people just cannot work. I guess I happen to be one of them.