What’s So Scary About Schizophrenia?

I’ve recently added new people in my life. I’ve branched out–taking on some endeavors that have put me into contact with people outside of my normal zone of relationships. This is, I think, a wonderful thing. I look forward to these new adventures.

One thing has come up, though. I am diagnosed with schizophrenia. I’ve been fortunate to have come across people who completely understand and totally get that there are a lot of misconceptions about schizophrenia.

Schizophrenia is, perhaps, one of the most stigmatized psychological disabilities. I can’t expect everyone to know everything. So, for those who happen across my blog, I’ve put together this little post to assure you that there’s nothing scary about schizophrenia.

For those who are unfamiliar with this psychological disability, I wanted to share the video below with you. It’s by Dr. Eleanore Longden. Last I knew, she works at the Psychosis Research Unit in Manchester, UK. If you have further questions about psychosis, I do encourage you to look up her and her colleagues’ work. It is excellent stuff.

The theory behind Longden’s work is that psychosis is a result of trauma. Using therapies–like Cognitive Behavioral Therapy–can help a person live with psychosis, according to Longden’s work and life.

There have been theories like this before when, for example, Freud posited a sort of loop between the psychological and the social which brings about certain psychological disabilities.

To folks who are new in my life: I have been in therapy for almost two years. I have taken medication for much longer than that. I am a so-called “high functioning” person diagnosed with schizophrenia.

Sure, I’ve had my struggles. But my struggles are not scary to you. At least, they shouldn’t be. I think of managing schizophrenia just like managing any other (less stigmatized) illness. It requires care, attention and focus. I have to attend to certain things about myself.

There are a few things that are, if I may say so, beneficial to being diagnosed with schizophrenia. I can understand and empathize with other people with psychological disabilities. I can appreciate all kinds of diversity in the world. I can understand new, innovative and unique thought processes.

The experience of hearing voices, having delusions and being paranoid–all of which may be present in a person diagnosed with schizophrenia–are not at all uncommon, actually. Tons of people have had experiences of slight paranoia, for example. (Think about an instance where everyone gets quiet when you walk into a room. Were they previously talking about you? If you wonder that, you have experienced an ounce of paranoia.) The difference between me and a person not diagnosed with schizophrenia is that my experiences have been a touch more extreme and have, in the past, interfered with my daily life.

You and I, then, are not so different. We are on the very same spectrum. I just happen to be at the 1% mark on the bell curve. But we are basically the same. Remember that next time you worry about a person being diagnosed with schizophrenia.

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