Weight Loss And Fitness

I’m in therapy. My therapist makes me do actual work. I get cognitive behavioral therapy. One thing I’m supposed to do is take at least one walk per day. Because it’s been cold, I have stopped that routine. As a result of that and the holidays, I gained a few pounds. So I’m ramping up my weight loss and fitness goals. I re-installed SparkPeople on my phone this morning. It helps me track my calories and exercise. Here’s a before picture of me. Let’s hope I can meet my fitness goals!

 

How Cheat Days Boost Self-Control

There’s an article in the Atlantic about how cheat days can boost your self-control. Since today was my cheat day, I was glad to see this. From the article:

[A] recent study suggests that it’s best to plan certain days on which you’ll cast off the shackles of your diet—or budget, or workout plan, or whatever ascetic goal you’ve set for yourself—and really just let loose. Temporarily, that is.

These so-called planned hedonic deviations, or “cheat days,” can boost your drive in the long run.

Why Exercise

There’s a large amount of evidence that exercise does not make you lose weight. I have lost over 10 pounds with really no changes in my exercise. All of my changes have been with my food, which is the most sound way to lose weight.

Yet, I plan on joining the gym at the beginning of the May. Why do you think that is?

It’s because, if you want to be fit and healthy, you should exercise. Just because exercise alone doesn’t make you lose weight doesn’t mean you should give up on exercise. Losing weight is not the only goal in life, especially if your aim is to be healthy.

Exercise can lengthen your life and, if you have schizophrenia, like I do, there’s evidence that exercise can help you quite a bit.

So, exercise away. Just make sure you understand it won’t help you lose weight very much.