Here Lies My Blog

Dear Reader,

I do not intend to write more at this blog. This has been an outlet for me, at times, to try on different hats, explore ideas and practice writing–a hobby of mine.

But it’s time to say farewell.

These days, there’s just too much I need to take care of in my life to keep up a quality blog–not that this blog was ever what one would deem “quality.”

See, this blog was initially related to the rest of the site–a professional blog. It morphed, as time went on, into a personal blog, where I shared ideas, thoughts, tried on different hats and, possibly, made a ton of errors. Hey–it’s my blog, my errors. I own them. But the blog, as it currently stands, doesn’t really relate to the rest of the site. It’s a mismatch. And I don’t have the time to keep it up and make it more professional. (Besides, I’m not in the same headspace I was when I made this website.)

I’m leaving the whole site, including this blog, up for a while–but don’t think it will be here forever.

Everyone knows that to be in contact with me, you should follow me on Facebook. That’s where I keep in contact with my friends and family.

I hope you have enjoyed reading.

RIP, blog. As they say, “It’s been real. And it’s been fun. But it ain’t been real fun.”

 

“The Thinker Who Believed in Doing”

Here’s a really good article on William James and pragmatism. An excerpt:

In a world of chance and incomplete information, James insisted that truth was elusive but action mandatory. The answer: Make a decision and see if it works. Try a belief and see if your life improves. Don’t depend on logic and reason alone, add in experience and results. Shun ideology and abstraction. Take a chance. “Truth happens to an idea. It becomes true, is made true by events.”

I confess that I’ve become rather fond of pragmatism over the years.

On Citizenship: The Problem With Birth Tourism

You’ve probably heard about the growing trend in Russia (and other places) for pregnant mothers to give birth to their children in America. This is, of course, not a very new idea. Some see it as exploiting a loophole. These folks ask: what can be done?

Well, there’s several possibilities. Here’s a few:

  1. Do nothing. Let these families give birth to their babies and do as they wish. This could lead to many possibilities, including closer ties with other countries and the breakdown of America as a global empire.
  2. Track the families of the babies to ensure they are not threats or foreign agents.
  3. Change our citizenship requirements. This would mean changing the constitution.
  4. Extend citizenship over certain countries. This would possibly be a colonial move, but it could be framed in a more positive light.

There are different ways of forming citizenship requirements–and this is something I’ve thought quite a bit about. You see, I’ve done some work on Native American issues. I gave birth to a Native American child. She gets dual citizenship–in both the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma and the United States. This is because she meets the citizenship requirements of both governments. As for me, I get no benefits from Choctaw Nation. I will never be able to get Choctaw citizenship because Choctaw Nation uses “direct lineage” or “blood quantum” as the requirement for citizenship.

My daughter gets to be a citizen of the United States because, in 1924, the United States granted citizenship to all Native Americans.

This was an interesting move. Some Native people wanted to be U.S. citizens, but others did not. This unilateral move is what finally gave Native Americans the ability to move forward as full citizens of the U.S. But it wasn’t all sunshine and roses.

Tribal nations are currently colonized by the United States. They are considered “domestic dependent nations.” As such, they have limited jurisdiction over their territories.

What does all this have to do with Russia? Well, if it turns out this is some ploy to defeat the United States, it’s clear that this will not work. The United States can unilaterally declare all Russians to be U.S. citizens. This would put Russia on par with tribal nations.

NAMIWalks

I’ve mentioned previously that I’m participating in NAMIWalks. The walk in Orlando is on April 30th. It’s an awareness raising and fundraising event. Please consider donating to NAMI through my NAMI walker website. It is safe and secure.

My page is here.

Breaking Stereotypes

What do you think of when you think of a person with schizophrenia?

If you are like most people, you probably don’t think of technology savvy people, using said technology to better themselves.

But according to this new survey, that’s exactly what the picture of schizophrenia is in America, currently. That puts me in line with other people with schizophrenia. I use a lot of technology–computer, smartphone, tablet–and I use all of this to connect with other people, including other people with mental illness, and gain information and other things to help me.

How We Treat Mental Illness

I read an article recently about the current method of treating mental illness, which was referred to as “the shotgun approach.” Basically, when you have a mental illness, they try different medications on you until they find one which works (hopefully). They do this even though the medications used to treat, say, bipolar or schizophrenia work in different ways.

In schizophrenia, at least, the current theory is that there may be different underlying causes for the same symptoms. So, the reason I have schizophrenia may be different than the reason someone else has schizophrenia. The underlying issues with the brain, or past trauma, or environmental factors, may all be different. That’s why Abilify may work for me, but not for someone else. And that’s the reason why other medications I have tried, which react in the brain differently than Abilify, have not worked for me.

So, people with schizophrenia may present with similar symptoms, such as hearing voices, paranoia, and so on, but the reason they have these symptoms may be completely different.

For me, it’s really hard to tell why I have schizophrenia, with the exception of looking at the drug Abilify and seeing how it works in the brain. Of course, there may be environmental factors at play with me that triggered things (it wasn’t easy being a teen mom, for example, and conservatives, who kept telling me how I was going to Hell or cutting funding for my high school, didn’t help), but there may just be something organically different in my brain. (Not structurally, though. I’ve had CAT scans.)

There are genetic and other tests they use for people who do not respond to medications which can give doctors more insight as to why someone has a certain disease, but these are not readily available. In my opinion, they should be. Too often, as in my case, several years are wasted trying different medications to no avail. Often, it takes years to find the right medicine. That’s wasted years for many people—when they could be productive years…if they had the right medication.

That was the point of the article: there must be some way to get people the correct treatment much sooner than what is currently happening. I know, in my case, it would have been helpful to have the right medication much sooner. I may have been able to keep working, or, at least, finish some projects I was working on. At any rate, I would have more sooner been able to enjoy a Spring day like today.

Jennie 4 13 16

Would Changing the Name of Schizophrenia Help End the Stigma?

There’s an article in the Huffington Post about how changing the name of schizophrenia might help end stigma. The proposed term is “psychosis spectrum.” That may be more accurate in terms of what people actually experience. There are varying degrees of schizophrenia. Personally, I never related much to the descriptions that are provided in much of the literature because, for example, it rarely states that schizophrenia can be episodic. I have experienced psychotic breaks that are episodic, so I never related to the image of a person who is constantly in a state of psychosis. So, “psychosis spectrum” may be more accurate.

Participating in the Arts Improves Mental Health

That’s according to this article, which discusses a survey that researchers conducted, asking people about their participation in the arts and their mental well being.

I have for quite some time been participating in the arts, whether it’s creating poetry, painting, coloring, or listening to music.

Take in some art today!