Does Finding Truth Require The Right Attitude?

I’ve become laid-back in my old age. I think I’ve also become more receptive to truth. In my quest to treat and think about schizophrenia, for example, I’ve turned in my old, piercing, rigorous mind and exchanged it for a more humble yet adventurous attitude.

In the world of academia, we often find disparate conversations going on. We find scholars who are unable to communicate with non-academics–but, worse, we find academics unable to communicate with each other.

Since I’ve always taken an interdisciplinary approach, I have tried my best to keep up with conversations in many areas of study. Interdisciplinary work is difficult. One reason why is because one has to become a translator of academic jargon–from psychology to philosophy–and then, for me, a translator from academic jargon into ordinary language.

I do my best, as any translator does, but I may miss the tiny nuances when I translate into ordinary language.

These piercing minds–which I used to possess–give us these conversations. It’s an attitude toward truth that most scholars have which constructs towers of babble upwards towards to heavens.

As I mentioned previously, I’ve taken a different approach to truth these days. I’m fond of pragmatism–in a nutshell, what is true is what works. Pragmatism is a world-centered approach. It isn’t looking for some abstract truth-in-the-sky. It is looking for truth in the world.

But is there a specific attitude one must have in order to be receptive to truth? I think there may be. One must, first of all, be an adventurous explorer, willing to try new things. In my quest for treating schizophrenia, for instance, I have had to be open to trying new medications, seeing if they work, and trying new therapies. I even prayed and undertook an exploration of Christianity because Christian psychology can re-structure cognitive processes. My exploration and willingness to try new things will be proven to work for me if my symptoms diminish over the long term.

In addition to being an explorer, one must have the attitude of a shred of skepticism, too. I know that treatments that may work for me may not work for everyone. I have to discuss progress with other people with mental illness and explore large-scale studies to see whether my treatments work for others.

Notice I focus on what works for me. Whatever works is what is true. Truth is what happens to an idea I may have. My idea becomes true just when it works.

I don’t think I need to have the piercing mind, engaged in the harsh minutia of conversations in academia in order to find truth. I just need the right attitude and the ability to explore.

Broken Bones and Psychosis: Psychosocial Causes and Testability

Imagine that you get assaulted. You are kicked in the leg and it is broken. You go to the hospital. Your leg is x-rayed, and casted. You are given crutches, and asked if you want to press charges.

That’s the way it normally goes, I assume, when you are assaulted and get a broken leg.

No one says you aren’t really hurt, even though your broken leg was caused by a social ill—a bad person assaulting you.

Now imagine you have a psychotic break. Your symptoms cause your family to call the police so you can be taken to a hospital. At the hospital, your blood is taken, you are given a CAT scan, and are, after a while, diagnosed with schizophrenia.

The tests in involved—taking blood, and CAT scan—don’t reveal anything. They are done in order to rule out other things. You are given an antipsychotic, and released from the hospital after seven days, when the doctors see that your medication seems to be working.

At home, you peruse the literature, and find that some people think your illness is not real the way a broken leg is real—because your illness, they think, has psychosocial causes. Perhaps you experienced a lot of adversity, or trauma as a child. These are things correlated with experiencing psychosis.

Not everyone who gets kicked in the leg will get a broken leg. That depends on a lot of things—where you were kicked, how hard you were kicked, if you were kicked repeatedly, and if your bones were prone to breaking.

Not everyone who experiences adversity or trauma will experience psychosis, either.

Both of these things can be caused by social illness, and social ills in combination with your makeup. If you have especially brittle bones, and some bad guy kicks you, you are probably more likely to get a broken leg. Likewise, if you “are prone to” (we don’t know what that means, but let’s not assume it means you are less “hardy”) psychosis and experience trauma, you are more likely to develop schizophrenia.

But no one says you aren’t *really* hurt when you get a broken leg this way.

Unfortunately, they do say this when you become psychotic.

There is no test, they say, for schizophrenia.

True, the biomedical markers for schizophrenia are not testable in most hospitals. They can’t, for every patient, check for chemical imbalances. Instead, they rule things out, try a medication, and see if that medication (in my case, regulating dopamine) works to restore health.

Not long ago, before the x-ray, they couldn’t *see* a broken bone, either. They had to do similar things in order to diagnose and treat a broken bone. The patient would, I assume, report symptoms and people could observe symptoms. That doesn’t mean broken legs weren’t real problems before the x-ray, just like it doesn’t mean psychosis isn’t real just because not everyone has access to MRIs.

Just because something may have a psychosocial cause, or can’t currently be directly apprehended in the hospital doesn’t make it less real.

How We Treat Mental Illness

I read an article recently about the current method of treating mental illness, which was referred to as “the shotgun approach.” Basically, when you have a mental illness, they try different medications on you until they find one which works (hopefully). They do this even though the medications used to treat, say, bipolar or schizophrenia work in different ways.

In schizophrenia, at least, the current theory is that there may be different underlying causes for the same symptoms. So, the reason I have schizophrenia may be different than the reason someone else has schizophrenia. The underlying issues with the brain, or past trauma, or environmental factors, may all be different. That’s why Abilify may work for me, but not for someone else. And that’s the reason why other medications I have tried, which react in the brain differently than Abilify, have not worked for me.

So, people with schizophrenia may present with similar symptoms, such as hearing voices, paranoia, and so on, but the reason they have these symptoms may be completely different.

For me, it’s really hard to tell why I have schizophrenia, with the exception of looking at the drug Abilify and seeing how it works in the brain. Of course, there may be environmental factors at play with me that triggered things (it wasn’t easy being a teen mom, for example, and conservatives, who kept telling me how I was going to Hell or cutting funding for my high school, didn’t help), but there may just be something organically different in my brain. (Not structurally, though. I’ve had CAT scans.)

There are genetic and other tests they use for people who do not respond to medications which can give doctors more insight as to why someone has a certain disease, but these are not readily available. In my opinion, they should be. Too often, as in my case, several years are wasted trying different medications to no avail. Often, it takes years to find the right medicine. That’s wasted years for many people—when they could be productive years…if they had the right medication.

That was the point of the article: there must be some way to get people the correct treatment much sooner than what is currently happening. I know, in my case, it would have been helpful to have the right medication much sooner. I may have been able to keep working, or, at least, finish some projects I was working on. At any rate, I would have more sooner been able to enjoy a Spring day like today.

Jennie 4 13 16

Would Changing the Name of Schizophrenia Help End the Stigma?

There’s an article in the Huffington Post about how changing the name of schizophrenia might help end stigma. The proposed term is “psychosis spectrum.” That may be more accurate in terms of what people actually experience. There are varying degrees of schizophrenia. Personally, I never related much to the descriptions that are provided in much of the literature because, for example, it rarely states that schizophrenia can be episodic. I have experienced psychotic breaks that are episodic, so I never related to the image of a person who is constantly in a state of psychosis. So, “psychosis spectrum” may be more accurate.

Chicago Trip

Two months ago, I visited Chicago. I stayed for a long weekend, and, during that time, I visited the Museum of Science and Industry, the Chicago SkyDeck, and the Art Institute of Chicago. I had a great time. All the exhibits were excellent. Below are some choice pictures.

This is the outside of the Museum of Science and Industry.

This is me in front of the nation’s only U-Boat:

U Boat

And here I am in front of the Art Institute of Chicago:

Art Institute

Lastly, here I am at the Chicago SkyDeck:

SkyDeck

Chicago is a wonderful place. I used the train or Metra to get everywhere I went. The Art Institute had many paintings I really, really appreciated. I took several pictures while I was there and thoroughly enjoyed my visit.